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Frequently Asked Questions

Number of FAQs related to Dataloggers and Data Acquisition Systems: 19

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  1. The CR1000, CR800, CR850, and CR3000 can accept PakBus connections from multiple terminals simultaneously, provided that all of the connecting nodes have unique PakBus addresses.

  2. Campbell Scientific dataloggers do not directly support LonWorks, but an industrial protocol converter can be used to add a datalogger to a new or existing LonWorks network. The protocol converter sits between the datalogger and the network, and it converts LonWorks requests to a protocol supported by the datalogger, such as Modbus, DNP3, SNMP, or others.

  3. Dataloggers, which may also be referred to as Measurement and Control Units (Systems) or Microloggers, are the heart of a data acquisition system. They measure sensors at a specific scan rate, process data, store the data, and initiate telecommunication. Our dataloggers also have control capabilities allowing them to respond to specific site conditions by opening flood gates, turning fans off/on, etc.

  4. Yes. The datalogger can control power to external devices under program control. For more information, see the “Decisions, Decisions, Decisions…” article.

    To turn a generator on and off, a solid state relay with a load capacity that matches or exceeds the power of the generator is needed. The relay is controlled by one of the control ports on the datalogger.

  5. Campbell Scientific dataloggers do not directly support BACnet, but an industrial protocol converter can be used to add a datalogger to a new or existing BACnet network. The protocol converter sits between the datalogger and the network, and it converts BACnet requests to a protocol supported by the datalogger, such as Modbus, DNP3, SNMP, or others.

    For more information about BACnet, see the “BACnet to Modbus/Modbus to BACnet Protocol Conversion” application note.

  6. Yes. All Campbell Scientific dataloggers currently have nonvolatile memory. Nonvolatile memory was added to the CR10X in 1996. All datalogger models introduced since then have included nonvolatile memory.

    Nonvolatile memory is reliant on the 3 V lithium battery inside the datalogger. As long as this internal battery has a charge above 3 V, no data should be lost if the datalogger loses power.

  7. Yes. We have developed programs for controlling devices and collecting data remotely. Program examples and datalogger wiring are provided in the 10164-L instruction manual. Contact Campbell Scientific for more information.

  8. The number of sensors that can be measured is determined by the sensor(s) and the datalogger(s). See the operator's manual for the sensor to determine the channels each sensor uses. The number of analog channels, pulse counting channels, switched excitation channels, digital ports, and continuous analog ports provided by each datalogger can be found in the small datalogger comparison chart and the large datalogger comparison chart.

  9. Possibly. If a voltage greater than 16 Vdc is applied to the wiring panel, it could damage the input and result in inaccurate measurements.

    Additionally, in some cases the sensors can be damaged if they are wired to the wrong channels. If a sensor, wired into an analog input channel, has an output of more than 5 Vdc, measurements on adjacent analog input channels may be upset. For example, the maximum full-scale range on the CR5000 is ± 5Vdc.