RETIRED ›
This product is no longer available and has been replaced by: CR1000. Some accessories, replacement parts, or services may still be available.

Overview

The CR10X provided sensor measurement, timekeeping, data reduction, data/program storage and control functions. The CR10X stored up to 62,000 data points. Data and programs were stored either in a nonvolatile Flash memory or RAM. A lithium battery backed up the RAM and real-time clock. The CR10X also suspended execution when primary power (BPALK, PS100) dropped below 9.6 V, reducing the possibility of inaccurate measurements.

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Benefits and Features

  • Designed for unattended network applications
  • Stores 62,000 data points (nonvolatile)
  • Data format options are mixed array (default) or table
  • Detachable keyboard/display, the CR10KD, can be carried to multiple stations

Images

Detailed Description

The datalogger consisted of a CR10XM Measurement and Control Module and black CR10X Wiring Panel.

The CR10X provided sensor measurement, timekeeping, data reduction, data/program storage and control functions. The CR10X stored up to 62,000 data points. Data and programs were stored either in a nonvolatile Flash memory or RAM. A lithium battery backed up the RAM and real-time clock. The CR10X also suspended execution when primary power (BPALK, PS100) dropped below 9.6 V, reducing the possibility of inaccurate measurements.

 

Specifications

Note: Additional specifications are listed in the CR10X Specifications Sheet.

  • Memory: up to 62,000 data points
  • Analog inputs: 12 single-ended or 6 differential, individually configured
  • Pulse counters: 2
  • Switched voltage excitations: 3
  • Control/digital ports: 8
  • Serial I/O port: 1
  • Scan rate: 64 Hz
  • Burst mode: 750 Hz
  • Analog volt. resolution: to 0.33 µV
  • A/D bits: 13
  • Programming: Edlog
  • Data Storage: Mixed Array, Table
  • Telecommunications: PakBus, Modbus, Alert

Compatibility

Use of the CR10X within a Data Acquisition System

A typical field-based CR10X system included:

  • CR10X Measurement and Control Module and Wiring Panel with specified Operating System
  • Alkaline or Sealed Rechargeable Power Supply
  • Weatherproof Enclosure
  • Communications Peripheral(s)
  • Programming and Communications Software
  • Sensors

Downloads

CR10X OS v.1.23 (1.45 MB) 04-02-2010

Execution of this download installs the CR10X Operating System (Mixed-Array) on your computer.  

Note: The Device Configuration Utility is used to upload the included operating system to the datalogger.  Requires an SC32A or SC32B.


CR10X-TD OS v.1.15 (645 KB) 03-28-2006

Execution of this download installs the CR10X Table Data Operating System on your computer.  

Note: The Device Configuration Utility is used to upload the included operating system to the datalogger.  Requires an SC32A or SC32B.


CR10X-PB OS v.1.10 (647 KB) 03-28-2006

Execution of this download installs the CR10X PakBus Operating System on your computer.  

Note: The Device Configuration Utility is used to upload the included operating system to the datalogger.  Requires an SC32A or SC32B.


Device Configuration Utility v.2.13 (44.7 MB) 08-25-2016

A software utility used to download operating systems and set up Campbell Scientific hardware. Also will update PakBus Graph and the Network Planner if they have been installed previously by another Campbell Scientific software package.

Known Windows XP Issue:

This software release includes Campbell Scientific USB drivers that will not install on Windows XP. To keep current with up and coming security requirements, the drivers have been signed with a SHA-256 encryption which is not supported by Windows XP. Windows XP users who have a need to install USB drivers for Campbell Scientific products can contact Campbell Scientific for an alternate solution.

View Update History

Frequently Asked Questions

Number of FAQs related to CR10X: 11

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  1. The CR10X has battery-backup RAM and clock. In other words, the program, final storage data, or clock settings are not lost if ac power is lost. Data is sent to final storage by an internal program. Data can be sent by an internal program from final storage to a storage module, computer, or printer using Instruction 96 Active Serial Data Output.

  2. The CR10X uses downloadable operating systems instead of PROMs and includes more instruction in the standard operating system. For a list of instructions included in the standard operating system, refer to the prompt sheet or CR10X manual.

  3. If the CR10X has Modbus OS, Wonderware can be used to display the data. Without the Modbus OS, LoggerNet software would be needed to collect the data and then the PC-OPC Sever software would be used to display the data.

  4. Instruction 15, Control Port Serial I/O, does allow the use of one control port for hardware flow control (RTS/DTR) or (TXD/RXD). The first control port is the (RTS/DTR) line. Baud rate is limited to 300 or 1200. 

  5. Yes. The data can be obtained directly from the CR10X using the Modbus protocol. The datalogger must have a Modbus operating system installed. The Modbus operating system can be purchased initially with the datalogger, or contact Campbell Scientific for a Modbus OS to retrofit the CR10X. Refer to the 13619 CR10X Modbus Operating System on CD page.

    An alternate method of obtaining the data is using OPC. Our LoggerNet and PC-OPC software are needed. The version of Wonderware must also work with OPC.

  6. If the RF modem has a CS I/O connector, then it should be compatible with the CR10X without the use of an SC932A. Ensure that the RF modem’s firmware is compatible with the CR10X firmware.

    Note: RF modems that are not sold by Campbell Scientific will only interface with a CR10X via an SC932A or an SC105. 

  7. Not the same, but similar. The SDM-SIO4 provides RS-232 voltage levels; the CR1000 control ports provide 0 to 5 V only. Both usually work with all sensors, and both devices are compatible with RS-232 and TTL logic. The CR1000 is easier to set up and program for serial input. The SDM-SIO1 is a preferred alternative to the SDM-SIO4.

    When compared to the CR10X, the CR1000 can handle strings as a specific data type. It also has more integrated serial interfaces including the following:

    • Four control port pairs—COM1 (C1 TX / C2 RX) through COM4 (C7 TX / C8 RX)
    • RS-232 port
    • CS I/O port for connection to CS I/O peripherals

    The serial I/O capabilities of the CR1000/CR3000 are similar to, and faster than, the SDM-SIO4 capabilities on a CR10X or CR23X. SDM devices are addressable and are connected to a datalogger on C1 through C3. Therefore, one benefit of using multiple SDM devices on a CR1000 datalogger is that only three control ports are used.

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